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The Death of Orpheus and Other Myths | CQAF2016
CQAF 2016

leo_boyd

The Death of Orpheus and Other Myths

The Black Box

28 April - 28 May 2016

Opening Event Thursday 5 May, 6.00pm

18 – 22 Hill Street
www.blackboxbelfast.com

Tickets also available In Person:

Visit Belfast
8 – 10 Donegal Square North
(Opposite front of City Hall)

Via Telephone
028 90 246 609

Taking a god’s eye view of a city one would see the buildings and roads expand and contract like a wave form. Far from being concrete, a city is in a constant state of flux where buildings rise and fall; where rivers are rerouted and paved over to become highways and suburbs spring up before being abandoned.

Of all human constructions cities are our greatest monuments where ghosts and myths rub shoulders with the everyday occurrences of traffic lights, pound-shops and late night bus stops. The inhabitants of the living city share their space with the ghosts of the past and the myths of the present, the streets throng with robots and phantasms, half remembered stories and hopes and fears for the future.

In this new series of experimental screen prints Leo Boyd takes the demolition of the Orpheus Building, a recent occurrence in the mythology of Belfast, and works into it to create a vision of a city where gods, ghosts and robots walk side by side with the city’s human inhabitants.

Leo Boyd is a screen printer based in the Belfast Print Workshop. His work is a mash-up of styles, from sci-fi b-movies to advertising and propaganda photos. Belfast often features in his work where the city plays as a backdrop to day-glo alien invasions and surreal dystopic visions.